Archive for summer solstice

Summer Solstice and Religious Myths

Posted in agnoticism, Astronomy, Atheism, Atheist, belief, Bible, Christianity, culture, humanity, life, prehistory, random, religion, science, thoughts with tags , , , , , , , , on May 8, 2010 by chouck017894

At noon each year on or about June 21-22 the Sun reaches its highest position in the sky in the Northern Hemisphere, and this recurring event is known as the Summer Solstice.  When this occurrence takes place the Sun is in its zenith at the Tropic of Cancer, and from the most ancient times the constellation of Cancer has always been known as “The Northern Gate,” or as “The Gate of Men.”

For three days during the solstice period there seems to be no movement of the Sun in relation to Earth, and then the minutes of daylight slowly begin to shorten—an initial decrease of light.  It is not coincidence that one of the two Johns in Christian legends is honored at this time.  Thus in Christian gospel John the Baptist is portrayed as having said, “He must increase and I must decrease.”  We should remember here that the other John, “Saint John”, is feasted on December 27th, right after the winter solstice, and represents the cycle of increasing light in the Northern Hemisphere.  It was an open secret among the Pagans that the name John when used in gospel accounts always personified some aspect of  light.  Indeed the Pagans through the Dark Ages guardedly spoke of the year as being divided between the two Johns rather than openly acknowledge the periodic occurrence of the solstices.  The reason for this was that the church considered such wisdom of nature to be “blasphemous” and would retaliated with brutal severity.

John, as the baptizer, is subtly associated with water which is the traditional symbol of life’s flow in nearly all cultures.  In prehistory times and prominent in Pagan background, the understanding of baptize was to be dipped under the waters of the world: meaning a commitment by each self-aware consciousness to take up its experience in physical-matter life.  By the gospel account of John baptizing Jesus it is obvious that baptismal rites were very ancient and had long been practiced in Pagan tradition.  From deliberate misinterpretation of the Pagan understanding that each self emerges out of the creative process as honored with the Pagan rite of baptism there arose the Christian practice where the recipient is alleged to be cleansed of original sin, given a name, and admitted into a specific system of belief.

As constellation Cancer assumes it periodic dominance in the skies, there always arises with it the constellation of considerable length known as Hydra, which Pagan cultures regarded as symbolizing desire and greed that accompanies life forms.  Baptismal rites in Pagan cultures therefore sought to cleanse, or at least dilute, these negative traits from contaminating one’s matter-borne spirit.  The gods of ancient Egypt, Greece, India, etc. were all portrayed as being baptized: indeed, John’s role as baptizer is a reflection of Egyptian myth in which the god Anap was the baptizer of the gods.  In all the Pagan myths the baptismal episode was always ornamented with supernatural phenomena.  So it is recorded in Luke 3:21 that “…Jesus also being baptized, and praying, the heaven was opened, (22) And the Holy Ghost descended in a bodily shape like a dove upon him, and a voice came from heaven, which said, Thou art my beloved Son; in thee I am well pleased.”  The same type of ornamentation is even found in the account of the call to duty of Mohammed in which it is declared, “Celestial regions were shaken by the tumult in the prophet’s soul.”  Then it is claimed that stars fell from heaven and frightened jinn fled in terror.  After this the angel Gabriel allegedly brought Allah’s direct command to Mohammed.

John the Baptist is honored during the dominance of the sign of Cancer.  He is presented in gospel as being somewhat older than Jesus, and the honor of John taking place in June thus established that he would be six months older.  The story incident of John leaping in Elisabeth’s womb when she and pregnant Mary met in quiet jubilation is an allusion to the time of the Autumnal Equinox, the halfway or adjustment period which heralds the Winter Solstice. 

John is said to have preached “in the wilderness” (Matthew 3:1), and in sacred language code “wilderness” always refers to pre-physical conditions that are active in the early involvement of Creation energies.  Also, John is portrayed as a “wild man” who was not especially capable of much love or patience for the primal conditions around him.  Because John the Baptist personifies first light emanation that accompanies creation, Jesus is depicted as saying that no one born of woman is higher than John the Baptist (Matthew 11:11).

The NT account of Jesus’ baptism by John is a most picturesque and dramatic presentation of transformation, and it is identical in meaning as OT stories where transformation of character is portrayed: i.e. Abram becoming Abraham, and Jacob becoming Israel.  The hidden meaning in these tales is the physical life that is taken up and made manifest is where qualification of primal energies embodied in each matter-form are to be utilized for advanced manifestation.

And the reason for the alleged beheading of John is identical in meaning as the “first-born” being slain in the myths of Exodus. Sacred language is used in both story renditions to disguise a scientific principle active in the Creation process.  That principle involves the heaviest elements in the atomic table. The heaviest elements are the first to be affected with dissolution and radiation.  It is the process of disintegration and radiation that creative elements are made free to create biologic forms, and atomic energy is converted into biotic energy.  Thus is all matter-life baptized in the waters of Creation.

John the Baptist, myth of

Posted in Astronomy, Atheist, Bible, Christianity, culture, history, life, random, religion with tags , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2009 by chouck017894

June 24–or Midsummer day–is alleged in Christianity to be the birthday of John the Baptist.  The date was a contrived arrangement instigated by Pope Gregory I (540?-604), who is called “the Great” because his pontificate was marked by fervor in propagating Christianity.  The conversion of Britain was begun under his direction and carried out by Augustine in 597, for example.  Gregory was passionately opposed to Paganism, introduced numerous changes in the liturgy of the mass, and is credited with revision of church music, better known as Gregorian chant.

The reason for Gregory’s passion for contriving a birth date for the unproven predecessor of Jesus was due to the Pagan’s midsummer festival which always coincided with the summer solstice and which was in honor of the Chaldean, Syrian, and Phoenician messiah Tammuz.  In his zeal for gathering Pagans into the Christian fold, Gregory had sent emissaries all across Europe, and the midsummer festival in honor of Tammuz was found to be lovingly favored nearly everywhere.  So entrenched was this yearly festival with its curious rites which engaged the minds of men that Gregory could not allow the season to pass without instigating some counter incentive for Christian purpose.  He was faced with the problem of what could the Christian faith business offer as enticement.

Gregory was divinely shrewd, counseling his subordinates (such as Augustine) that if Pagans were to be lured into the church the wisest policy was to make an effort to meet the Pagans half-way.  The answer to the dilemma was to incorporate the festival activity into the calendar of Christian holy events.  Of course it was impossible to retain an honor to Tammuz or Bel, but nothing in the myths of Jesus Christ could be linked as occurring specifically around the summer solstice period.  O what to do?

Then divine inspiration struck.  Since the birth of the Savior was honored at the time of the winter solstice, and John the Baptist was said to be  born before Jesus’ birth, was it not reasonable that the summer solstice was the birth time of his forerunner?  Hallelujah!

The Vatican think-tank had to contrive a link with Pagan thought though.  The link was discerned hiding in Pagan Mysteries:  there, after  Tammuz had been slain, he reappeared to the faithful under the name Oannes, and the name used in sacred language adopted by the Roman Church for John was Joannes!  Double Hallelujah!

Thus the Pagan festival of June 24 was made to cohabit with Christian ideas under the label festival of Joannes–Nativity of St. John–which, not so subtly, begins exactly as the Chaldean festivities.

The Pagans were not really fooled by all this jockeying.  They remembered that the name John was also  part of the church promotion of Christmas, with the feast of  “Saint John” the disciple (a personification of light) celebrated on the 27th of December immediately after the winter solstice.   Because retaliation from the church could be harsh, even deadly, the heathens and Pagans mockingly spoke of the year being divided “from John to John.”