Archive for secular state

God’s Henchmen

Posted in Atheist, Christianity, culture, history, random, religion, secularism, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on April 22, 2009 by chouck017894

In the last quarter of the twentieth century, May 1985 to be exact, Pat Robertson, the televagelical mogul, was featured in a magazine called On Cable. Robertson, filled as usual with eternal boundless self-righteousness (ego), declared that he sought to remake America into a “biblically based nation.” His fiery right-wing politics was characterized by him as the “conservative, religious, and biblical point of view.” That “point of view” had been so slickly packaged by the time of his 1985 interview that his organization was siphoning in more than seventy million dollars a year.

The long held ideals and the values placed on diversity and plurality by the American people were regarded by Robertson to be “extreme dangers” of a secular state. The rights of minorities were being threatened in his “conservative” view drawn from biblical inspiration (that just happened to see nothing wrong with slavery). In public schools, he insisted, the children were being taught “a collective philosophy” that would lead citizens toward Marxism, socialism, or a communisitic type of ideology. In his humble (egocentric) opinion it was logical to denounce the Department of Education as unconstitutional!

Never shy about telling the nation what God wanted, Robertson asserted that the U.S. Supreme Court of the time had departed from history and the constitution. He worried publicly about “encroachment” of the judiciary. Thus Robertson charted a course to “engage” in what he termed “advocacy journalism,” and his Christian Broadcast Network (CBN) “news teams” began grinding out propagandist mini-documentaries with heavy “conservative” messages. Perhaps the heavily tilted Catholic (5 of 9) Supreme Court of today is more to his approval.

The CBN “news team” at that time was headed by a man once the editor of  The Washington Times, which just happened to be owned by the “Reverend” Sun Myung with all his questionable North Korean connections. The “born again” population, Robertson averred, was seriously under-represented in government. The evangelical then tried to ease the minds of skeptics declaring,  “The basic thing people do not understand is that evangelicals in America are not plotting to take away the rights of everybody else.”

Robertson, the modern age version of the biblical prophets, then announced that “God is going to thrust his people into positions they never dreamed they were capable of taking on.” (Bush, Cheney and others that schemed their way into federal government positions did seem to fill the requirements as set down by most biblical stars.) If the heavy tilt of religiously obsessed persons in government positions in recent years has been any indication, and if their corruption of true democratic principles is an example of a “biblically based” nation, can we truthfully say the sly takeover that Robertson advocated was “fairly benign”? 

His prophecy was on the button though; the U.S. got a born againer thrust into a government position that he was incapable of taking on.  With the blessings of eight years of bible-based leadership and conduct now behind us,  is there any doubt that a “biblical point of view” raised the nation’s standards in corruption, spying, waging war, wealth dispersion, imprisonment, torture and similar biblical niceties? 

The rise of televangelism in America from the 1950s is assessed in Time Frames and Taboo Data: A History of Mankind’s Misdirected Beliefs.