Archive for Nazis

Party-Line Terrorists in USA

Posted in Atheist, culture, history, humanity, life, politics, random, religion with tags , , , , on August 15, 2009 by chouck017894

Back in the 1920s, with the aid of paid-off police and disgruntled high-ranking officers of the Reichswehr (German army), the German army was drawn upon by the National Socialist German Workers Party (Nazi) to organize the Sturmabteilungen (SA, “storm troop”) to defend its meetings and to actively disrupt the  meetings of liberal democrats, Socialists, Communists and trade unions.

Today we are seeing similar disruptive tactics being undertaken in the USA now that the Republican Party has become but a shadow of its former self.  In the Nazi Party activity—under Hitler as “unlimited chairman—in the early 1920s much of the party’s propaganda concentrated on denunciations of the “menace” of so-called Bolshevism.  In the USA today the corporate interests, the “unlimited chairmen” in this reenactment who have grown super-wealthy by gouging the public, are actively financing and manipulating the party-liners with poisonous deceits and distractions.  Like the Nazi tactics, the adherents to the radical political right in the US today are being herded into contempt for democratic principles and are being agitated in defense of special interests’ prosperity—not for genuine health care coverage.

Following the onset of the world economic depression in 1929, unemployment increased, foreign trade declined, and agricultural prices dropped—and these events inspired a desire for revolutionary policies.  Large sums of  money were then pumped into the Nazi Party by German millionaire capitalists, just as today corporate bigwigs in the US are pumping multimillions into the propaganda against enactment of a national health care system for all citizens.

As Nazism gained power in Germany, pretexts were concocted to cover violent actions taken against political parties that might stand in the way of Nazi ambitions.  In February 1933 the building that housed the German national Parliament was destroyed by a suspicious fire of incendiary origin—a lucky break for the Nazis.  The Nazis, of course, blamed the Communists, and with brutal violence moved to suppress all Communist principals.  Next to be violently suppressed was the Social Democratic Party.  With these two political factions crushed, all other parties were subsequently outlawed, with the Nazi Party elevated as the only “legal” party, and any attempt to form a new party was declared to be a crime.

Crucial in Nazi ideology was the concept that for the realization of Nazi aims and the creation of “Greater Germany,” the use of intensive propaganda and military force were deemed indispensable instruments of party policy.  (We saw the attempts to wedge the same type policies into US government through the troubling years 2000-2008.)  Very quickly the working class and liberal democratic opposition in Germany found their constitutional and civil rights abolished, and in 1933 the Geheime Staatspolizei (Secret Police), known as the Gestapo, was created to suppress any opposition to the Nazi regime.  The Gestapo was declared not subject to legal restraints and responsible only to Hitler and Heinrich Himmler.

The disruption of Town Hall Discussions by brainwashed, misinformed party-liners on the proposed health care policies in the US will only contribute to a continuation of high-cost medical expenses for all citizens.  Similar as in the Nazi regime game plan, the only real winners in defeating national health care policy for US citizens will be the elite corporate dealers, their industries, and the financial tricksters.  Health care in the United States should not be allowed to remain centralized in corporations that do not hold any true respect or compassion for the quality of human life.

So when you see Town Hall Discussion meetings on health care being disturbed and trashed, ask yourself–Who are the ones that are really imitating Hitler-Nazi anti-democratic conduct.

Art and Religion

Posted in Art, Atheist, Christianity, culture, history, humanity, Middle Ages,, nature, religion with tags , , , , , on June 17, 2009 by chouck017894

“…culture does not grow only out of worship of God.”

This sane observation was made by a member of the Conservative Christian Democrats in Germany back in September 2007.  It was in response to a Roman Catholic cardinal’s sneering assessment of art in the newly opened museum built on the ruins of Cologne’s St. Kolumba Church (Columba, Irish missionary, known as the “Apostle of Caledonia”).   The cardinal, Joachim Meisner, had earlier felt it his holy duty to criticize the artist who had designed the stained glass windows for the Cologne Cathedral.

The cardinal pontificated in a sermon at the opening of the museum saying that it was dangerous to allow art to break away from religion.  He elaborated that an “indisputable connection” existed between culture (i.e. art) and religion, and if culture was “uncoupled” from worship then both religion and culture would disintegrate.

The cardinal’s choice of words–the word entartete (degenerate) in particular–slashed at painful psychological wounds to many German ears.  In 1937  the Nazi party had jockeyed for its power grab and part of their strategy was to attempt to ban artworks, especially expressionists, that they deemed counter to their objectives—the restructuring of German culture.  The artworks confiscated by the Nazis were declared to be “Entartete Kunst,”  degenerate art.

In spite of Cardinal Meisner’s claim as to what constituted proper art, art was not exactly appreciated by the early molders of the Roman Church.  In the saga of the  church, as the “fathers” floundered about concocting doctrine and dogma, most art representations–except for harshly defined crosses–were spurned.

As noted in Time Frames and Taboo Data, the 13th century saw unwelcome change thrust upon the church.  To quote: “The arts were coming out of hibernation and Nature was being restored with dignity that had been previously thought unworthy.”  (page 276)  But the art that came into church approval somewhat later (14th century) still consisted mainly of stiff, unnatural representations which continued in style until realistic treatment of space was initiated by the Florentine painter Masaccio (1401-1428).

Even then the propaganda value of art continued to be only vaguely understood by the church.  Then c. 1527 (to quote from TFTD), “The church was feeling the pressure of discontent among the masses and a strategy had to be devised to gain broader appeal.  The promotional strategy that was then undertaken (by the church) is well recognized in today’s advertising medium.  The church (under Pope Clement VII) sought to overwhelm the masses in the sensual appeal of art, music, and lavish display.”  (page 312 TDTF)

So Cardinal Meisner’s dismissal of any art display in the cathedral other than that which pleased his religious interpretations deserved the mild rebuke by the German public official.