Archive for Exodus

Disguised Background of Moses Epoch

Posted in belief, Bible, culture, faith, Hebrew scripture, history, prehistory, random, religion, scriptures, theology with tags , , , , , , , on January 17, 2015 by chouck017894

The timeframe upon which the Moses epoch was loosely structured was most probably c. 1576-1490 BCE. This was a particularly rough period for planet Earth and turmoil had continued for centuries following the earlier frightening event when a rogue planet-sized comet had lunged out of the skies from the general direction of planet Jupiter. Electromagnetic imbalance in the solar system resulted in interplanetary disturbances, and cultures worldwide were dramatically affected. In the following timeframe 1490-1480 BCE, for example, the royal city of Ugarit went down in flames, and in this same timeframe the cities of Troy, Knossos and the walled cities in the Indus Valley were also destroyed. Using the 1480 BCE date as anchor-point (which lasted to at least around 1200 BCE) not only the Hebrews (who were cast by priest authors as Israelites) but people everywhere suffered through worldwide calamities.

If this was the broad timeframe in which Moses allegedly heard God speak to him personally from a burning bush, he would have been around eighty years old (if he had been born c. 1576 BCE–one of the numerous dates that are debated). The approximate earlier date 1486 BCE is also often associated with the Exodus and the Moses tale. Still another date often theorized as the Moses saga is the 1480 BCE timeframe, which happened to be when Thutmose III came of age and officially became pharaoh of Egypt; until then his mother Queen Hatshepsut, wife of Thutmose II, had overseen her son’s duties in his name. (Note the mose part of the names.)

The plagues which Hebrew Scriptures (Exodus) claim was God’s way of affirming his favoritism for the Israelites and his divine prejudice against the Egyptians is largely priestly liberty with actual planetary circumstances. The plagues in the setting used for the Moses epoch were not peculiar to that narrowly focused region of the world. Worldwide upheavals in this period also plunged the Phoenician trading empire into decline due to the fall of so many trading partners. Indeed, much of this was recorded by Chaldeans, Hebrews, Greeks, Minoan Cretans, Egyptians, East Indians, Chinese, and even the South American Mayans. In the priestly accounts (as in Jeremiah 7:20) God is quoted as saying, “Look! My anger and my rage are being poured forth upon this place, upon mankind and upon domestic animals, and upon the tree of the field and upon the fruitage of the ground; and it must burn, and it will not be extinguished.” This is how holy hatred is glorified.

The unstable planetary conditions which lasted for generations were drawn upon by later priest authors for their own advantage. As portrayed by the priests, God is claimed to have spoken to Moses from a thick cloud upon Mount Sinai saying, “I am the Lord your God who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage (some translations incorrectly interpret this as out of the “house of slavery”). About this time, according to scriptures, God promised the Israelites that if they obeyed his “laws” (as interpreted by the priests, of course) they would prosper from what amounted to his conditional love. Thus were the Exodus 19:4-6 verses reinforced in which God supposedly said, “…you shall be to me a nation of priests and a holy nation.” The tone of this claim of selectivity rather tarnishes its credibility as spiritual truth.

The date most commonly given for the death of Moses is 1456 BCE. In the book of Deuteronomy 32:49 and 34:1, written long after the depicted wandering events (probably written by the High Priest Hilikiah in Jerusalem in seventh century BCE) Moses is averred to have died atop Mount Pisgah after viewing the Promise Land. This mount is identified with Mount Nebo, a mountain in Moab near the north end of the Dead Sea (and where later Jeremiah supposedly hid the Ark of the Covenant). This Mount was from ancient times held to be dedicated to the Sumerian-Assyrian-Babylonian god Nebo, the son of Marduk chief god of ancient Babylon, who bore the title of “Ilu-tashmit,” meaning god of revelations, and he was regarded as a soothsayer or prophet. From this the Hebrew word for prophet became nabi or nebi.

Many features of the Moses saga clearly indicate that the priest-written “history” actually concerns the process of energy involvement and development into matter form (Creation activity), not of some selected human leader who escorted “bound” Hebrews to a new location. Just as with the parting of water in Genesis, the waters are parted for Moses and the Israelites (elementary particles) to move into diverse and defined life archetypes. Indeed this is what is alluded in Exodus 33:20-23 where Moses, symbol of the Life Principle, is told by God, “Thou canst not see my face…” “…thou shalt see my back parts”—a clear reference to the primal condition from which life is made manifest. The fabled character of Moses can never see God’s front parts–the evolutionary results–because he symbolizes the energy action of the Life Principle up to where pre-physical energies begin to congeal and transform into material-matter form. And this is why Moses must “die” when that objective is within sight. It is therefore a certainty that “…no man knoweth of his sepulcher unto this day.” (Deuteronomy 34:6–written c. 8th century BCE)

Among the divine mysteries of this tale none is more puzzling than the manner in which the Lord is alleged to have fed the starving Israelites in the “wilderness.” According to the priest-written account over six hundred thousand Israelites were miraculously fed with manna. The Israelites were depicted as on the verge of annihilation and a somewhat indifferent Creator sent them only a microscopic form of nourishment. As claimed in the text, “And when the dew that lay was gone up, behold, upon the face of the wilderness there lay a small round thing, as small as hoarfrost on the ground. And when the children of Israel saw it, they said one to another, It is Manna; for they wist not what it was. And Moses said unto them, This is the bread which the Lord hath given us to eat.” (Exodus 16:14-15) HUH? Is it wise to believe that over six hundred thousand starving persons were given “bread” as small as hoarfrost as sustenance? This story feature clearly attests that the chronicle of Exodus is not history but is allegory of the Creation process, and the “hoarfrost” refers to elementary particles being infused with subatomic elements. Everything which is made manifest as matter-form is nourished by subatomic particles.

Perhaps the most honored part of the Moses saga is of God making Moses the bearer of the Ten Commandments to the stranded Israelites. Strangely, these Commandments passed through several transformations of their own, and became guidelines for moral/ethical conduct only after 700 BCE–and which were again rewritten in 400 BCE. The earliest intention in the “Commandments” which Moses would have received and relayed from the personified Source of Creation certainly could not have been in regard to moral and ethical behavior in the “wilderness” (prototypal conditions). Moses, traditionally revered as the “Law Giver”, is depicted as having descended from an ecstatic rendezvous with the Lord on Mount Sinai. The law-giver is commonly pictured as standing erect with the “laws” which he carried etched upon two stones . This image indicates allegorically that the “laws” did not originally concern moral conduct among physical beings but concerned the principles of genetics. All that could have been decreed there in those primal circumstances (“wilderness”) would concern genetic purity–the “law” of Creation which established that like is to beget like. This is Creation’s powerful “law” which carries weight far beyond the principle of genetic reproduction; it applies equally to each individual’s thought patterns which determine each person’s lifestyle and how they interact with others. Lost in this self-serving scriptural storytelling style is that this “law” of like must beget like also brings reprisal after its own kind. Thus this “law” of reproductive energy indeed supports divine advice to do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Miriam, Sister of Moses and Aaron

Posted in belief, Bible, faith, Hebrew scripture, history, prehistory, random, religion, scriptures with tags , , , , , on July 1, 2014 by chouck017894

In the priest-written Hebrew Bible, in Exodus (2:4 and 7-8, and in Numbers 26:59) a female character is presented as Moses’ sister who watched over the baby Moses from the bulrushes after he had been cast adrift upon the waters. The infant was launched upon the waters of life, which was depicted as a means of circumventing the pharaoh’s decree that all first born Hebrew/Israelite males were to be slain. We should note here that Miriam is always associated with the waters of life and is honored as a prophet. The timeframe setting of this priest-written Moses/Aaron/Miriam saga is commonly placed c. 1400-1300 BCE. The character Miriam does not play any significant connective role with Moses until chapter fifteen of Exodus following the Israelite’s passage through the Sea of Reeds (not the Red Sea) in which the Pharaoh’s army had been drowned. The text that actually spotlights Miriam to Moses occurs in the scene where she is briefly depicted as singing the first verse of the victory song, known as the Song of the Sea, which is attributed to Moses (Exodus 15:1-18). In celebration of the godly-instigated carnage she sings, “Sing to the Lord, for he has triumphed gloriously; Horse and rider he has thrown into the sea.” This praise of imagined divinely induced destruction is thought to be one of the oldest parts of the story.

Miriam remained pretty much in the background in priest-written holy history until the book of Numbers (12) where she and brother Aaron are portrayed as speaking critically of Moses’ leadership. Their legitimate complaints is portrayed as angering Yahweh, and being divinely peevish the Lord then punished Miriam–but not Aaron–by afflicting her with a skin disease (called tzaraat). (Again the priestly belittlement of women.) Tzaraat has been traditionally and erroneously translated as “leprosy”, however the illness most likely referred to skin cancer or leucoderma, i.e. cutaneous eruptions. The appalling priest-composed book of Leviticus says that a person stricken with tzaraat was tamei and such a condition made them unsuitable to perform the duties as high priest, so Aaron could not have been allowed to be equally cursed.

Strangely, neither of Miriam’s miracle-working brothers, try as they may, could conjure up a cure for their sister. As noted, it would not be permissible for the high priest, Aaron, to be equally punished (Miriam allegedly instigated the critical complaining) thus Aaron is cast as ethically pleading with Moses to intercede with Yahweh in Miriam’s behalf. Miriam is then grudgingly allowed by the Lord to return to unblemished form by following the schema he had set in place for Creation processes: her healing thus began by being placed outside the wilderness camp (within the primordial energy conditions) for seven days (as in the “days” of Creation). This rehabilitation follows the prehistory lessons which taught how creative energies involve to take up intended matter form–that being where passive involvement of energy-substance moves through primal energy dimensions of development toward manifestation as matter.

The name Miriam, the sister of Moses and Aaron, can be traced back to ancient cultures to gain some revealing insight to this story. The name evolved outof the Sumerian/Babylonian name Meriam (spelled with an e), and she was imagined as the chief of the “Turbulentos,” which were the personifications of the turbulent, raw, volatile energies (waters) which flood out of Creation’s source. The association with the turbulent “water” of Creation, as interpreted by the eighth century BCE Yahweh priest authors, clarifies the link of Miriam with the Song of the Sea. When Judaism was being shaped into a monotheistic faith system by priest-authors c 9-8th century BCE, the Sumerian/Babylonian Meriam was reworked as Miriam and presented as the older sister of Moses. Thus the entire priest-written Israelite “history” was structured on prehistory lessons which once taught how energy manifest as matter. And that fabricated Israelite history was composed for the purpose of establishing a sense of tribal elitism. And the imagined “history” also happened to provide a fraudulent aura of legitimacy for the priests to claim privilege and power.

In Exodus 26 Miriam is alluded to as the savior of the Israelites because it was due to her righteousness that the Lord sanctioned a miraculous well, which, as the story goes, accompanied the Israelites during their long years of desert wandering (through the primal planes of energy). Miriam is said to have died when the Israelites were in Kadesh, and Numbers 20:1 states that she was buried there. (The exact site of Kadesh has long been a subject of controversy, which seems peculiar if the Creator wanted all the world to honor his chosen ones.) As a personification of Creation’s primal waters, Miriam could not continue into the advanced stage in which energy attains matter-form (nor could Moses or Aaron). It is claimed that the miraculous well which had accompanied the Israelites through the desert wanderings, then disappeared after she died and water then became scarce. Then, like an afterthought, God is said to have opened a spring (energy as matter) for the Israelites in honor of Miriam, and that spring carried the name Meribah. Miriam is also presented in Islam’s Quran (28:11).

Miriam is remembered in the last book of the Old Testament, Micha 6:24, as having been one of the three leaders of the Exodus saga. In Jewish culture during the Passover Seder, a glass filled with water (waters of life), called a “Cup of Miriam,” is sometimes placed in memory beside the customary “Cup of Elijah,” which is filled with wine (the wine of life).

As noted earlier, the name Miram evolved out of the Sumerian/Babylonian accounts of Creation, wherein the turbulent, raw energies out of the Source were referred to and personified as the Turbulentos. In those prehistory accounts the Chief of the Turbulentos was named Meriam. Consquently, Meriam served as the root source of such names as Miriam, Myrian, Martha, Merti, Meri, Mary, and numerous other names. From this also the Hebrew word march evolved, meaning image, vision, appearance, etc., and so it is through Moses’ sister’s name Miriam that we received our word mirror. This is reflected, may we say, in the aim part of the name Mir-iam, for these letters designated the still waters at the margins of Creation’s waters–the waters in which one may see their own reflection—the indisputable means by which every personal consciousness may perceive I AM a reality of Creation.

Fables From the Book of Judges

Posted in agnoticism, Atheism, Atheist, belief, Bible, faith, random, religion, thoughts with tags , , , , , , on August 21, 2010 by chouck017894

There is no lack of blood and guts in the Old Testament.  Exodus gives us Godly plagues cast for the benefit of the Israelites, and God mercilessly drowned the pharaoh’s army for daring to pursue God’s alleged favorites.  Leviticus lists twenty-eight alleged God-approved methods for killing any persons who did not knuckle-under to priestly judgement.  Joshua is praised for being the instigator of a grand-scale holocaust extermination of the inhabitants of Canaan.  And the book of Judges is primarily a collection of war stories that focus on Israelite personalities who felt driven to eliminate their neighbors.  The book is commonly defined as containing the “history” of the Israelites during the rule of the Judges.

What is never explained is why God should have neurotic need for mortals’ militant devotion, or why he would feel so much prejudice for everyone in the world except the Israelites.  If he is the omniscient Creator of everything as presented in Genesis, then this claim fails to ring true.  Certainly the assertion provides absolutely no spiritual enlightenment for seekers, for it dwells totally on material acquisitions.  (This may, perhaps, explain why the radical right-wing religionists campaign so shamelessly for a “God-based government” in the US.)

It should be remembered that these bloody biblical stories were written in Jerusalem in the 7th century BCE.  In considering the book of Judges as revealed history, a careful reader will ponder over the fact that the time span that is presented is much too long if it is supposed to cover events from instituting the rule of Judges to the anointing of Saul in the mid-eleventh century BCE.  The book of Judges does not coordinate the savior-judges to each other for the simple reason that the book is a collection of stories that circulated about separate tribal heroes.  And there is the typical editorial contrivance of having the traditional twelve starring characters.  The actual featuring of individual “judges” is not taken up until Judges 3:7, and the tales conclude at 16:31; but the alleged bloody events were all said to have been carried out “in the spirit of Yahweh.”

The book of Judges is part of the Deuteronomists collection assembled by priest-authors in 7th century BCE Jerusalem.  The intent, more political than spiritual, was to present a version of heritage for the people of Israel that would inspire and unite the people.  But the stories in Judges cannot be taken as factual history of Canaan in the earlier timeframe of the 12th or 11 centuries BCE.  For one thing, the chronological order can only be described as surreal; if taken at face value the events cover approximately 400 years.  Tradition place the Exodus events in the 13th century BCE; the exploits of the savior-judges, therefore, would have only 200 years to play out all their heroic parts.

The  reason for the distorted time line is to imply that the various tribal myths took place as a continuous history involving persons who arose out of obscurity to perform heroic deeds to save the dream of Israel.  The priestly rewrite of tribal myths never failed to place the blame for Israel suffering under the assaults of oppressors as being the result of the people having repeatedly backsliding in their worship of Yahweh.

Among the traditional twelve Judges of Israel there are listed:  Othniel (Judges 3:7-11), of the Caleb tribe, who supposedly beat back a Mesopotamian foe named Cushanrishathaim;  Ehud (3:12-30), of the Benjamin tribe, who assassinated the Moab king Eglon;  Smamgar (3:31), portrayed as having slain 600 Philistines with an ox goad.  Then there is Yael, the wife of Herber, a Kenite, who is glorified for killing a Canaanite general named Sisera by driving a tent stake through his skull while he slept.  Deborah and Barak shine in Judges 4:1-23, but Barak is said to have killed Jabin, the king of Hazor, which is weird, for it is said in the book of Joshua that Joshua did the bloody deed.  Another judge was Gideon (6:1-8.35), who summoned the Israelites to attack the Midianites and pursued them to the river Jordan.  He was offered a crown for his leadership, but refused, asking only for the many gold earrings captured from the enemy, from which he is said to have fashioned an ephod (for the meaning of ephod see post Sex in Sacred Disguise, March 2009).  Gideon then sacrificed his loving daughter in appreciation of victory over the Ammonites (11:34-40).  And we must not forget Samson (13:1-16.31), and the hair-raising story of his killing 1000 Philistines with the jawbone of and ass.

Samson is something of a misfit as a “judge” for he is not portrayed in any leadership action against enemies of the Israelites; his are personal battles with the Philistines.  His inclusion in the book of Judges is based solely on his alleged bringing down the Philistine temple, thus implying the superiority of the god Yahweh.  Samson is the Hebrew version of the Greek Heracles (Hercules), mixed with Apollo.  The name means “man of the Sun,” so what we are offered is really an allegory of the sun’s power.  That it is myth, not history, is also revealed in the style of story development.  All Pagan and scriptural myths depict only briefly a demigod’s or hero’s birth.  As are some other biblical heroes, Samson’s mother had been barren, but an angel of the Lord told her that she would bear a son, and then the story leaps to his adult life.   The secret of Samson’s strength was in his hair; in other words, the sun’s rays.  It is a Hebrew myth mimicking of the Apollo myth, the Greek sun god, of whom Homer said, “…he of unshorn hair.”  The Philistine vixen, Delilah, is said to have discovered the secret of Samson’s strength, and while he slept she cut off his “seven locks” of hair.  Embedded in the name of the villainess is the Hebrew word lilah, which means “darkness” or “night.”  Prefacing lilah with D, the Hebrew daleth, which means “door,” indicated that De-lilah personified darkness, which in all mythological tales always symbolized the underworld. 

The Deuteronomists examples of God’s alleged favoritism of the Hebrew/Israelites continue in the books of Samuel, the alleged king-maker.

Scripture’s Contrived History

Posted in Atheist, belief, Bible, culture, faith, history, random, religion, thoughts with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 16, 2010 by chouck017894

According to scriptural accounts a Jewish kingdom of Israel was welded in the land of Canaan by David, and his kingdom is portrayed as having prospered as a great unified kingdom under David’s son, Solomon.  That account was long accepted as a given truth by biblical scholars until the science of archaeology showed conclusively that the claimed powerful kingdom said to have been ruled from Jerusalem could not have existed as portrayed in the priest-writings.  No hard archaeological evidence has ever been found to support the priest compiled story, but has revealed instead that Jerusalem was simply a modest, economically borderline village in the era when David, Solomon and Rehoboam (son of Solomon) are claimed to have ruled. 

Archaeology has revealed that the territory north of Jerusalem in the claimed timeframe was considerably more populated and flourishing economically than the region around Jerusalem.  However, in biblical myth the northern territory is claimed to have broken away from the alleged unified kingdom under Solomon’s son (c. 931-913 BCE), and developed as the kingdom of Israel.  Both territorial areas did worship YHWH among other gods, spoke dialects of Hebrew, and wrote in the same script, but the southern territory (Judah) became more developed much later than the northern; it had remained sparse due to its more rugged terrain.  The bond of blood kinship of the northern and southern territories was openly acknowledged, but they had become politically divided.  Until the northern kingdom of Israel fell to the Assyrians (c. 734 BCE), the little “kingdom” of Judah languished in the shadow of Israel.  The fall of Israel was a blessing for the priests based in the village of Jerusalem who had long lusted to impose their method of religious observance upon all Hebrew people and wished to make the temple in Jerusalem the holiest place of their faith. 

Josiah, son and successor of Judah’s King Amon, came to the throne at the age of eight (c. 639 BCE), and was tutored by priests during his youth.  Because of this background Josiah soon reestablished the worship of Yahweh/Jehovah.  And it was during Josiah’s reign, apparently by divine providence, that a book of law was allegedly discovered by the high-priest Hilkiah when workmen were repairing the temple (as recorded in II Kings 22).  Josiah was inspired by the miraculously produced writing which has ever since been accepted as the book of Deuteronomy, supposedly the work of Moses.  Deuteronomy only recapitulated the law already recorded in Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers, but the framework in which the laws are set is notably (suspiciously) different from that of the other codes.  Notable in Deuteronomy is the contention that the Exodus version of the Covenant with Yahweh/God at Sinai was not made on the basis of the Decalogue; instead it is implied that only ten laws (Commandments) were given to the people at Sinai, with the rest delivered to Moses alone, and promulgated later at the Jordan.  This conveniently allowed enormous leeway for the high-priest Hilkiah to restructure and reform religious practice that gave greater prominence to themes of God’s sovereignty, justice, mercy and love rather than to outward observances of ritual and ceremonial emphasis.  In the discovered sermon of Moses it reads, “For you are a people consecrated to Yahweh your Elohim; it is you that Yahweh our Elohim has chosen to be his very own people out of all the peoples of the earth.”  This happily aligned priestly ambitions with that of Josiah’s inherited  dominion, and just happened to inspire a narrow national outlook.

With Israel reduced to secondary power and refugees fleeing south into Judah, the priests devoted to YHWH moved to expand, and they established shrines and sanctuaries at Dan and Bethel.  And as refugees poured in from the north the Yahweh priests in Jerusalem quickly embarked on a prodigious propaganda campaign of rewriting history and codifying material that now makes up the early books of the Old Testament.  Additional books were compiled to promote the impression that the little kingdom of Judah had been divinely ordained.  To account for the alleged split in the united kingdom into rival kingdoms, the blame for it was given with the myth of Solomon having his heart turned from YHWH by his foreign wives.  Sadly, for trusting believers, over one hundred years of intensive archaeology investigation have never been able to confirm David or Solomon as historical persons.

The Backside of God

Posted in Atheism, Atheist, belief, Bible, Christianity, culture, faith, freethought, history, humanity, life, prehistory, random, religion, thoughts with tags , , , , , on May 28, 2010 by chouck017894

In the magic show atmosphere that prevails in most biblical accounts, that which is imaginatively disguised is often some creative principle of life manifestation.  In the book of Exodus, for example, there is presented a curious conversation between Moses and God in which God tells Moses, “…Thou canst not see my face…” but “…thou shalt see my back parts…”  (Exodus 33:20-23).  We may, perhaps, safely assume that God did not moon Moses, but that the priest-authors of this myth used sacred language to relay ancient scientific knowledge that was not comprehensible to the ordinary masses.  The mythical Moses could never witness God’s front parts for the simple reason that Moses is a personification of primal energy development up to the pass over point where energy activates as matter manifestation.  Moses represents primal energy movement after its inaugurate phase.  It then passes through the first  four developmental stages (disguised as 40 years), which sacred language always refers to as the “wilderness.”  In more ancient teachings this pre-matter energy activity was referred to as involution—where primal energies involve.  The face or front parts of God alluded to in the tale are the energy developments after primal energies have involved sufficiently to initiate manifestation (or pass over) as a dense matter event.  This resultant evolutionary side (or front side) of God (the Life Principle) is not observable in the process of involution.  The secret in this presentation is that Moses himself represent the backside of God!

What this peculiar Exodus scene attests to is that advanced knowledge had once been taught in distant antiquity in regard to how primal energies interact in the Creation process and how energy becomes matter.  But due to worldwide catastrophic events, that knowledge had survived among only a few.  Attempts to provide insight into the process of matter manifestation was a serious commitment for early teachers, but over time that knowledge became submerged in myths in an anxious attempt to make it at least somewhat comprehensible to the unschooled.  Unfortunately, the greater scientific  implications became lost even to those who would follow and teach from the adaptation.  And the biblical version of “history” evolved from that means of interpretation.

The story elements of Exodus, however, show that the character of Moses was intended to represent symbolically (personify) the energy-action of what may be termed the Life Principle within the dimensions of involution up to the transformation of pre-physical energies into structures of physical matter.  This is also the reason why Moses had to die just when he reached the point where he was in sight of the “Promised Land.”  Being representative of the elemental energy conditions in the Creation process, Moses could not proceed further than the edge of the energy plane where primal energies coalesce and become dense matter forms.

Another clue  to the hidden meaning in the Moses myth is in regard to the Mount upon which Moses  is alleged to have played out his final scene.  The name of the Mount is taken directly from the Babylonian god Nebo who was revered as the god who “announces the fate of humankind,” and “the upholder of the world,” and “the opener of the ears of understanding.”  As the prophet-god of the Babylonians, Nebo was presented as beholder of that which was destined to be, which is imitated with Moses beholding the Promised Land.

One more curiosity:  The name Moses carries the numerical value of 345, and the numerical value of Jehovah is 543.  This slyly confirms, as noted here earlier, that Moses himself represents the backside of God.

Heaven in Turmoil

Posted in agnoticism, Astronomy, Atheism, Atheist, belief, Bible, culture, faith, history, life, prehistory, random, religion, science, thoughts with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 23, 2010 by chouck017894

Curiosities abound throughout the “authorized” accounts of humankind’s history.  Few, however, are as baffling as to why the celestial body we know as planet Venus suddenly became the object of worldwide attention around the general timeframe 1650-1600 BCE.  In this timeframe the Babylonians were well-schooled in mathematics, calculations, algebra, and quadratic equations, and they had become increasingly nervous about disturbances taking place in the heavens.  Astronomical records were being kept in the reign of Ammisaduga, and from these it is clear that astronomers were fully aware that the routine rotation of stars around Earth was an illusion that was caused by Earth revolving on it own axis.  The plotting of heavenly mechanics such as the equinoxes and solstices were routine to them. 

So it was a situation of uneasiness to witness the looming presence in the sky of an unknown celestial object—especially since its presence coincided with an alteration in Earth’s rotation and tilt.  And there was also the small matter of the volcanic mountain Stroggili on the Isle of Thera (Santorin) having erupted in the Mediterranean—one of the planet’s oversized volcanic eruptions.  It was in this period that the new celestial entity began being addressed as a deity—a goddess of awesome beauty and terrifying power—an awe and fear that would possess the people of the world for many generations.  Indeed, this period of frightening and dramatic celestial changes is attested to in later Roman literature, such as the book Of The Race of the Roman People by Marcus Varro.  In this book the author related that the planet we know as Venus had “…changed its color, size , form, course, which had not happened before nor since…”  Varro backed up his account saying that renowned astronomers affirmed that the event had indeed happened to the “Morning star,” and it had never happened before or  since.  Varro also noted, “…we read from the divine books that even the sun itself stood still when a holy man Joshua, the son of Nun, had begged this from God.”  Let us note here that even “saint”  Augustine quoted from this man’s book. 

The timeframe in question here, c. 1600s BCE, is another period that has often been accepted as the period-setting for the Exodus story—as well as being the “time of Agog,” who allegedly laid the foundation of Thebes (Egypt).  It can be understood how recollections of such chaotic events could be confused, condensed and intermingled by later historians.  There is, as example, a Samaritan chronicle that relates that during the time period in which Joshua supposedly led an invasion into Canaan a new star was born in the east.   If this star-birth event took place in the time allotted to Joshua, then it predates the timeframe for the Moses tale by centuries.  The Samaritan account of the new star said it held power “against which all magic is vain.”  That pretty much discredits the claim that Joshua had any influence over the heavenly bombardment that took place. 

Of interest  in connection with this are the findings unearthed by recent archeologists that confirm that events of the Joshua story were in reference to celestial conditions and activities that took place earlier than events that make up the Moses epic.  The later priest-historians at work  in Jerusalem (c. 800 BCE) found it more beneficial to their purpose to reinterpret past events to provide themselves with a history that supported their claim to authority. 

There are other scriptural stories that tell of these heavenly happening and the continuing threats from the heavens that went on for generations.  Approximately fifty-two years after c. 1600 BCE, or around 1548, the celestial body that had so traumatized Earth seems to have emerged out of decades of clouded skies to appear as a radiant new member of the solar family—that is to say it had attained a fairly orderly orbital pattern among the neighboring planets. The Assyrians called the new planet Ishtar: the Greeks called it Aphrodite: the ancient Mexican records name it Quetzalcoatl: and the Romans would call it Venus. 

The heavens were not yet peaceful, however, and Earth had more to endure.  The awe and fear that the new planet still inspired is shown in it being addressed as beautiful but fearsome celestial deity.  Even some 750 years later(c. 800 BCE) the new planet still exerted strong influence upon planet Earth to trigger exogenous disturbances in Earth’s rotation, which coincided with a  reverse in Earth’s magnetic field.  And this is the timeframe of the “prophet” Isaiah who had this to say about the adjustment of the new-neighbor planet: “How art thou fallen from heaven O Lucifer (Venus), son of the morning!  How art thou cut down to the ground, which didst weaken the nations!” (Isaiah 14:12-13)

Even as late as c. 606 BCE, the timeframe of the “prophet” Jeremiah, the inhabitants of Earth were still apprehensive of the orbital irregularities of planets Venus and Mars—for the Venus intrusion had serious effect on the orbit of the once peaceful Mars.  In this period, even in spite of the recent Babylonian invasion and destruction of Jerusalem, the Jews still gave Venus devotion as “queen of heaven” and burned incense and offered wine to her on the roofs of buildings.  Jeremiah was an astronomer, and was portrayed as a “prophet” simply because he could chart the likely times of violent planetary interactions.  Thus in the book of Jeremiah, chapter 44, the account says all the men knew that their wives had burnt incense unto other gods (meaning to Venus).  And the women adamantly continued to “burn incense unto the queen of heaven, and to pour out drink offerings unto her, as we have done, we, and our father, our kings, and our  princes, in the cities of Judah, and in the streets of Jerusalem…”

Reference to the heavens once being in disarray can be found in many ancient records and texts.  And even when they are part of accounts deemed sacred there is a peculiar self-inflicted blindness that such planetary caroming through the skies could have once taken place.  Even today’s science denies it.  And the heavens remain indifferent at mankind’s lack of curiosity.

Breastplate, Sexy Biblical Garb

Posted in Atheism, Atheist, belief, Bible, faith, random, religion, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on September 9, 2009 by chouck017894

(Continuation of Dressed for Sex, Bible Style.)

It was noted in the earlier post that the biblical character Aaron’s holy duty was to minister “in the holy place,” and to do this he was instructed to take upon himself “garments for glory and for beauty” (Exodus 28:40); garments of which it was said “…from the loins even unto the thighs they shall reach.”   Since the name Aaron means “to conceive,” and he is to be in the breastplate when he is ministering “unto the holy place,” the breastplate is sacred language jargon to describe the feminine or polar half necessary for the conceiving process.

The “breastplate” that Aaron was charged to  put on when going in to minister “unto the holy place,” is said to have been outfitted with two gold rings “upon the two ends of the breastplate on the border thereof, which is the side of the ephod inward.”  Two gold rings are placed “…on the two sides of the ephod underneath, toward the forepart thereof, over against the other coupling thereof, above the curious girdle of the ephod.” (Exodus 28:27)  Curious indeed!

The gold rings mentioned in connection with the ephod represent the female organs of conception and the place of fecundation.  (Remember, gold represented the sacred respect directed to whatever is focused upon.)  “And thou shalt put in the breastplate of judgment the Urim and Thummim…”–symbols of light and perfection–which refers to the genetic purity of each life species.  The instruction had absolutely nothing to do with sexual morals, chastity or the like, but with the process by which all life is conceived. 

That the Urim and Thummim are held to have specific attributes in the breastplate is a prime clue.  “And thou shalt put in the breastplate of judgment the Urim and Thummim, and they shall be upon Aaron’s heart when he goeth in before the Lord (law); and Aaron shall bear the judgment of the children of Israel upon his heart before the Lord (law) continually.”  (Exodus 28:30)

The words Urim and Thummim have never been given clarification in meaning, but are traditionally theorized as referring to stones that were perhaps used as lots—a theory based solely on accepting the description of the breastplate literally.  According to texts in Exodus and Leviticus, Moses placed the Urim and Thummim into Aaron’s breastplate, which is commonly accepted to mean into a small square  pocket attached to the ephod.  As usual, ignorant literalization of priestly stories is to be led into spiritual confusion.

The Urim and Thummim imagined to be stones have caused some biblical scholars to surmise they were of different colors, by which the practice of divining god’s will was determined–like casting of lots.  Another interpretation can be traced back to the writings of Josephus (37?-95?)—a strangely unverifiable Jewish historian—that asserted that the jewels on the breastplate became luminouson on occasion.  The suggestion reveals that the author, whoever he was, had an understanding that the ancient term UR always referred to light.  (Remember, Abram/Abraham, whose seed was blessed by god, is said to have come from Ur.)

Since the name Aaron translates in meaning “to conceive,” the light that is implied in the word Urim is the light of life that is to be conceived.  As a personification of the conceiving force, Aaron is thus charged with the duty of bearing the light and diversity of life upon his heart.”   Urim and Thummim, therefore, represent the polar aspects that determine and segregate (judge) the diverse essences and characteristics of each life form, hence this feature is a vital part of the “breastplate of judgment.”

The Urim and Thummim thus serves as astonishing symbolism linked with sexual reproduction, for the “judgment” that is implied is in regard to the segregation into different gametes of paired alleles in meiosis.  In other words, the cell division in sexually reproducing organisms that reduces the number of chromosomes in reproductive cells to half that found in the somatic cells, leading to the production of gametes in animals and spores in plants.  This is then given emphasis with the decorations of  pomegranates and bells that are said to have been embroidered at the hem of the high priest’s garment, for they symbolize seed bearing and the fruition that rings out as life.

  • Abridged from The Celestial Scriptures.  CMH
  • See related post, Gemstones in the Bible, June 2009