Archive for breastplate

Breastplate, Sexy Biblical Garb

Posted in Atheism, Atheist, belief, Bible, faith, random, religion, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on September 9, 2009 by chouck017894

(Continuation of Dressed for Sex, Bible Style.)

It was noted in the earlier post that the biblical character Aaron’s holy duty was to minister “in the holy place,” and to do this he was instructed to take upon himself “garments for glory and for beauty” (Exodus 28:40); garments of which it was said “…from the loins even unto the thighs they shall reach.”   Since the name Aaron means “to conceive,” and he is to be in the breastplate when he is ministering “unto the holy place,” the breastplate is sacred language jargon to describe the feminine or polar half necessary for the conceiving process.

The “breastplate” that Aaron was charged to  put on when going in to minister “unto the holy place,” is said to have been outfitted with two gold rings “upon the two ends of the breastplate on the border thereof, which is the side of the ephod inward.”  Two gold rings are placed “…on the two sides of the ephod underneath, toward the forepart thereof, over against the other coupling thereof, above the curious girdle of the ephod.” (Exodus 28:27)  Curious indeed!

The gold rings mentioned in connection with the ephod represent the female organs of conception and the place of fecundation.  (Remember, gold represented the sacred respect directed to whatever is focused upon.)  “And thou shalt put in the breastplate of judgment the Urim and Thummim…”–symbols of light and perfection–which refers to the genetic purity of each life species.  The instruction had absolutely nothing to do with sexual morals, chastity or the like, but with the process by which all life is conceived. 

That the Urim and Thummim are held to have specific attributes in the breastplate is a prime clue.  “And thou shalt put in the breastplate of judgment the Urim and Thummim, and they shall be upon Aaron’s heart when he goeth in before the Lord (law); and Aaron shall bear the judgment of the children of Israel upon his heart before the Lord (law) continually.”  (Exodus 28:30)

The words Urim and Thummim have never been given clarification in meaning, but are traditionally theorized as referring to stones that were perhaps used as lots—a theory based solely on accepting the description of the breastplate literally.  According to texts in Exodus and Leviticus, Moses placed the Urim and Thummim into Aaron’s breastplate, which is commonly accepted to mean into a small square  pocket attached to the ephod.  As usual, ignorant literalization of priestly stories is to be led into spiritual confusion.

The Urim and Thummim imagined to be stones have caused some biblical scholars to surmise they were of different colors, by which the practice of divining god’s will was determined–like casting of lots.  Another interpretation can be traced back to the writings of Josephus (37?-95?)—a strangely unverifiable Jewish historian—that asserted that the jewels on the breastplate became luminouson on occasion.  The suggestion reveals that the author, whoever he was, had an understanding that the ancient term UR always referred to light.  (Remember, Abram/Abraham, whose seed was blessed by god, is said to have come from Ur.)

Since the name Aaron translates in meaning “to conceive,” the light that is implied in the word Urim is the light of life that is to be conceived.  As a personification of the conceiving force, Aaron is thus charged with the duty of bearing the light and diversity of life upon his heart.”   Urim and Thummim, therefore, represent the polar aspects that determine and segregate (judge) the diverse essences and characteristics of each life form, hence this feature is a vital part of the “breastplate of judgment.”

The Urim and Thummim thus serves as astonishing symbolism linked with sexual reproduction, for the “judgment” that is implied is in regard to the segregation into different gametes of paired alleles in meiosis.  In other words, the cell division in sexually reproducing organisms that reduces the number of chromosomes in reproductive cells to half that found in the somatic cells, leading to the production of gametes in animals and spores in plants.  This is then given emphasis with the decorations of  pomegranates and bells that are said to have been embroidered at the hem of the high priest’s garment, for they symbolize seed bearing and the fruition that rings out as life.

  • Abridged from The Celestial Scriptures.  CMH
  • See related post, Gemstones in the Bible, June 2009 

Gemstones in the Bible

Posted in Atheist, Bible, Christianity, culture, history, random, religion with tags , , , , , on June 13, 2009 by chouck017894

The Pentateuch (first five books of the Bible), attributed to Moses, presents the oldest known record in western writings to have itemized twelve different precious stones.  Twelve mounted gems are recorded as being a feature of the breastplate said to have been worn by the High Priest Aaron, and each gemstone allegedly represented one of the Israelite tribes.

In the list was sardius, a red colored stone upon which was engraved the name of Rueben.  It is likely this stone, sardius, became known as ruby because of that association with Rueben.

The second stone, topaz, may have signified peridot (olivine), which was described as having a color like an unripe olive.  Or it may well have been in reference to chrysolite which are various yellow or greenish-yellow stones.  But it was known as topaz in the list, and allegedly bore the name of Simeon upon it. 

The stone that supposedly designated the Levites was called baraqah in Hebrew, was described as shining like burning fire or lightning (from barqa, meaning lightning).   This is thought to be the stone known today as carbuncle, an almandine garnet with deep red, violet-red or black coloring.  From the biblical description of color the garnet nearest the described color suggests either pyrope or spessartite.

Judah is said to have been represented with the emerald, being pure green without any other color in its makeup.  Emeralds were mined in ancient Egypt, and the authors of the Pentateuch would have been well acquainted with the stone.

The stone associated with the tribe Issachar is ill-defined, but was apparently deep blue and somewhat translucent.  Tradition has favored the impression that the stone referred to sapphire.  (The sapphire associated with the Ten Commandments was quite another thing.)

Dimond (not diamond) is mentioned in the Pentateuch, and said to be perfectly white and “beautifully sparkling;” so sparkling in fact that it was said to be able to induce sleep and dreams.  The tribe of Zebulon was said to be inscribed upon it.

In the Middle East the stone ligure was known as “Dam stone,” dull green in color with dark red reflections.  This bore the name of Dan–from which the name “Dam stone” probably arose. 

Possibly the oldest precious stone known to man is the agate, chiefly brown, red, or sometimes bluish, gray or black with clouded translucency.  This was the stone of the tribe of Naphtali. 

The transparent stone amethyst, described in ancient times as purple with a strong bluish hue, was the stone apparently assigned to the tribe of Gad. 

The stone spoken of  as beryl in the breastplate description is traditionally held to be the bluish-green aquamarine.  The Semitic name for this stone was “Tarshish,” which suggests its origin was Tartesus, a region in southern Spain that was known for mineral and ore riches.  The stone represented the tribe of Asher.

Onyx, the chalcedony variety, a translucent stone of parallel layers of different colors, was the stone apparently assigned to the tribe of Joseph (who happened to have a coat of many colors).

Jasper is the last stone mentioned in the breastplate description, said to be green-clouded with either white or red and yellow–not quite the jasper we think of today.  In parts of the Middle East, however, nephrite or jadeite were to be found and was probably the stone that represented Benjamin.

With these stones together with the Urim and Thummin (Exodus 28:30; Leviticus 8:8), the High Priest Aaron supposedly could communicate with and divine the will of “The Most High.”  Being stoned was clearly to his advantage.

Sex in Sacred Disguise

Posted in Atheist, Bible with tags , , , , , , , on March 28, 2009 by chouck017894

The information in this post is abridged from The Celestial Scriptures: Keys to the Suppressed Wisdom of the Ancients.

As noted in a previous post (Religion’s Sexual Roots), sexual references are often disguised in Holy Scriptures by a technique that may be termed sacred language, i.e. use of euphuism to pass secret meaning among the priest editors. That which was disguised in books such as Exodus will undoubtedly shock many devout Bible readers.

In Exodus the character of Aaron (whose name means “to conceive”) held the role of high priest and was allegedly instructed to costume himself with numerous curious items of clothing declared to be “garments for glory and beauty” (Exodus 28:40). A couple of verses further it says that the garments “…from the loins unto the thighs shall they reach.” With these “garments” Aaron and his sons were to “minister in the holy place.” The chapter then ends stating that these required “garments” are to be “…a statute forever unto him and his seed after him.” The required “garments” are listed as breastplate, the ephod, two onyx stones, and pouches of gold. The rites to be enacted with these “holy gaments” also included the liberal use of “holy anointing oil.”  The meaning of that will soon become apparent.  

What do other “garments” signify? The word ephod is derived from the Greek ephebos, which means entering upon early manhood–a time of raging hormones and acute sexual urges. Bluntly, the ephod therefore refers to an erect phallus, the organ of conceiving. That the ephod is the phallus is further admitted in verse 32 where it says, “And there shall an hole to the top of it, in the midst thereof; it shall have binding of woven work around the hole of it, as it were the hole of an habergeon, that it be not rent.” (Habergeon, a sleeveless coat of mail: one might say the coat is circumsized.)

Of the two onyx stones (verses 9 through 14) the instruction is that all the names of the children of Israel are to be engraved upon the two small stones. Although the implication seems to be that only six tribal names are to be written upon each of the two stones (the names of the descendants of Jacob/Israel), the phrase “children of Israel” means the entire countless descendants–millions upon millions. The reference to the two onyx stones as part of the “garment” is therefore in regard to the testes.

The “garment” inventory continues by saying that the “onyx stones” are “to set in pouches of gold.” Gold is symbolic of high regard–or sacred respect–for the scrotum and its contents.

The feminine aspect of this “garment” list begins with the mention of breastplate which Aaron is charged to wear (enter into) when ministering “unto the holy place.” This “garment” is outfitted with two gold rings “upon the two ends of the breastplate on the border thereof, which is in the side of the ephod inward.” Two other gold rings are placed “…on the two sides (in other words the ovaries) of the ephod underneath, toward the forepart thereof, over against the other coupling thereof, above the curious girdle of the ephod.” (Exodus 28:27)

Priestly talk is curious indeed!

The gold “rings” mentioned in connection with the ephod represent the female organs of conception and the place of fecundation. The instruction continues, “And thou shalt put in the breastplate of judgment the Urim and Thummin…” Now these objects have been the source of bafflement for millennia, generally guesstimated as probably used to divine the will of god (as in Exodus 28:30 and Leviticus 8:8). That the Urim and Thummin are held to have specific attributes in the breastplate is a prime clue. Another clue is in the preface UR, which in prehistory times was a reference to light. “And thou shalt put in the breastplate of judgment the Urim and Thummin…” and “judgment of the children of Israel” is determined by this placement. In other words, genetic factors (DNA) are determined by the coupling of the breastplate with the ephod. Thus Aaron, a personification of the conceiving force, is charged with the duty of bearing the light and the diversity of life “upon his heart.”

The symbolism used in describing these “holy garments” is astonishing, for the “judgment” is in regard to the segregation into different gametes of paired alleles in meiosis. In other words, the cell division in sexually reproducing organisms that reduces the number of chromosomes in reproductive cells to half that found in the somatic cells, leading to the production of gametes in animals and spores in plants. Thus the instruction for the decorations was that the hem was to be embroidered with pomegranates and bells–symbols of seed bearing and the fruition of life.