Archive for angels

Allegory of Solomon

Posted in belief, Bible, faith, Hebrew scripture, history, random, religion, scriptures with tags , , , , , , on December 21, 2012 by chouck017894

The last character in holy scriptural accounts to whom god allegedly appeared visibly was Solomon.  There is a reason for this, and it is traceable to earlier Pagan scientific knowledge.  In the development of energy into the stage of visible matter, the first visible phenomenon of that activity is a focused point of light.  And that concentrated light shines as a transformational marker in the development of dense matter, and ancient Pagan teachings referred to that in-between stage as etheric matter, which they symbolized with the Sun.

So significant is the energy change out of the etheric matter stage that a whole eight chapter book is dedicated to it in the Bible.  It is the Old Testament book known as the Song of Solomon, which tends to embarrass the “experts” on religious meanings.  What these “songs” were metaphorically drawn upon was the creative principles where energy figuratively becomes enamored with the generative involvement as dense matter.   The “songs” were fashioned on lyrics that came down in oral tradition long before priests in Jerusalem gathered them into canonical form.  Despite all their titillating imagery, the real meaning in the lyrics has nothing to do with physical sexual attraction, but uses that  suggestively because everyone can relate to that attraction.  So the uptight “experts” can relax.

The mythic character of Solomon, the mythic son of the unverifiable David, personifies that etheric nature of the Sun which radiates and rules over the life force active in the dimensions of energy as matter.  Allegorically, Solomon therefore is depicted as Lord or king over the dense matter dimensions of energy.  The Sun, being visible but not developed as a dense matter object, is a logical marker of energy poised between prototype matter and defined matter.  Once the scientific basis of Pagan symbolism is understood, it becomes obvious that Solomon represents solar power and all the claims presented for the alleged character of Solomon become clarified.

In regard to Solomon being the last character in holy scripture to allegedly see the Creator visibly, the ancient Pagan teachings should be consulted.  When the development of energy into dense matter form is achieved, the primal stages of development of that energy involvement cease to be seen.  Figuratively, the Sun, as the first stage of visible matter, therefore may “see” that primal creative energy which is personified as the Creator God.  For this reason the scriptures record no more personal appearances of the personified Creator as being seen by any of the subsequent scriptural characters.  All the succeeding characters that merit storytelling space gain their “divine” insight only through visions and/or dreams, not from any direct encounter with the deity.

It must be remembered that the books of 1 and 2 Kings, in which Solomon is featured, were written centuries after the timeframe of the purported events.  The author was most likely Baruch ben Nerian, the scribe to the “prophet” Jeremiah.  The name Solomon was derived from the Roman word Sol, ie the Sun; and Om (or Aum), the Hindu mantra characterizing supreme power; and On, the Chaldean-Egyptian address to the Sun.  (Yes, the priests of Yahweh in Jerusalem were aware of Hindu belief.)  As the representative of the Sun which rules over the solar family, it becomes obvious why Solomon was characterized as having unparalleled wisdom, for light has always symbolized wisdom.  And knowing that Solomon is representative of the Sun, the enormous wealth that he is alleged to have possessed has rationality.  The legendary “mines” from which he is alleged to have drawn that enormous wealth is none other than the Sun itself.

Past generations have been more cognizant of the fact that biblical tales often placed great importance on numbers.  Indeed, numbers bandied about in holy tales served as symbols that, in themselves, tell the initiates a far different story than they do to those who take each tale at face value.  Authors of scriptural tales often played with those numbers, disguising them within myths.  The Hebrew word yod, for example, is the number six, and it signified God at the sixth dimension (“day”) of Creation.  When yod was repeated three times it was a (magical) devotional address to God.  That numerical code is found in the myth of  Solomon in the allegation that his gold mines yielded “…six hundred threescore and six talents of gold” per year (1 Kings 10:14).  Thus the gold value is disguised as yod repeated three times, or 6+6+6.

The Hebrew/Judaic regard for the devotional three-time recitation of yod was therefore inverted by this New Testament author as beast 666.  As a result Revelation 13:17 equates the claimed yearly financial excess of Solomon’s gold in Hebrew scriptures with the pursuit of greed and evil, saying, “And that no man might buy or sell, save that he had the mark or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.”   However, the “name” or “mark” or “number” is intentionally made ominous by not being clearly explained.

More clues to the occult meaning of the character of the scriptural Solomon are hidden in other aspects of the tale as well, such as the name given for Solomon’s mother, Bathsheba.  And also in the story feature that the Queen of Sheba is said to have come to Solomon for his blessing.  The word “sheba” signifies “seven,” and in ancient Pagan teachings based on scientific principles, the seventh plane of energy development is the achievement of visible matter, symbolized with the Sun—the creative purpose or blessing of energy involvement.

When the more ancient (and scientifically based) Pagan symbolism is consulted, it becomes clear why, in spite of all the claims made of Solomon’s wealth and his alleged worldwide recognition, he was never mentioned in any records of any of the nations that supposedly interacted with him.  All the deeds, fabulous wealth and eccentricities of Solomon are to be found only in Hebrew scriptural myth.

There is a curious feature in scriptural storytelling lineup, which is that in the timeframes that followed the unverifiable Solomon, no one, not even the “prophets,” ever encountered so much as an angel, let alone receive their “revelations” directly from a visible deity.  The closest that any “prophet” came to seeing even an angel is the minor “prophet” Zechariah, and he saw that angel only in a vision.  The belief in angels is traceable to Pagan wisdom also.  The ancient lessons on Creation were in regard to the available units of creative energy which are drawn upon from the non-manifest (quantum) conditions in the Source by all matter-forms.  Those creative energies necessarily accompany and sustain every faction of consciousness; thus everyone and everything in the visible plane can figuratively be said to have their “guardian angel.”  They do, however, have the frustrating characteristic of remaining invisible to us.

(Related post: Solomon’s Majesty, August 2009)

Myths of Angel-Demon Warfare

Posted in Atheist, belief, Bible, Christianity, culture, faith, freethought, random, religion, thoughts with tags , , , , , , on January 1, 2011 by chouck017894

 According to priest-written texts, a state of war exists between “the kingdom of God and the kingdom of darkness.”  It is an alleged constant confrontation between light, said to represent God, and darkness, which therefore represents the imagined “Devil.”  Envisioning the interacting principles of polar activity which are necessary for generating energy-matter manifestations as constituting “kingdoms” once served as explanation to ease the uncertainties that confronted our primitive ancestors.  The notion of “spiritual warfare,” however, provides nothing coherent to open any real understanding of our personal connection with universal power that is refered to as each person’s “spirit.”

There is, of course, scriptural foundation for the notion that apparent conflicts of interest are messing around with God’s loving intentions for man.  In the opening book of Genesis, for example, that conflict of interest is presented in chapter three where Nachash (from Hebrew, translated as “serpent”) supposedly relayed to the naked man and woman who had already received domination over the earth (Genesis 1:26)  a different motive for God’s earlier instructions.

With this motivational theme set in place, spiritual warfare pops up a number of times in scripture, such as in the book of Psalms, the alleged poetic compositions of David.  Psalms 17:5, 140:4, and 149:6-9 touch upon the spiritual battle theme, but it is Psalms 18 that presents graphic references to battle equipment used in defeating the strategies that opposed God’s divine intent for man.  In this version, the spiritual realm is not much different from the physical realm as far as warfare is concerned.

The priest-authors of 2 Kings 6:15-18, writing in the 7th century BCE Jerusalem, fanned the scary concept of the “prophet” Elisha (story-setting 849-785 BCE) in confrontation with invisible dark forces; it was a feature calculated to inspire the “sheep” to knuckle-under to priestly authority.  And in the book of Isaiah 59:17 spiritual warfare is alluded to in the reference to the “breastplate of righteousness” and the “helmet of salvation.”

One of the more detailed biblical examples of imagined spiritual warfare is given in chapter 10 of the book of Daniel—a revised work which happens to be an elaboration borrowed from an older Babylonian poem.  The “prophet” Daniel, after three weeks of fasting and praying for understanding, was finally visited by an angel sent to deliver a message from the Lord.  The angel was too unfashionably late and explains that he had been sent out  immediately after Daniel had begun to pray, but “…the prince of the kingdom of Persia withstood me one and twenty days” (Daniel 10:13).  Apparently the omniscient Lord had not foreseen such a possibility, and the archangel Michael finally had to go forth and put down the prince from Persia so the angel could make contact with the “prophet.”

The Christian interpretation of demons who are led by the devil attempting to challenge the will of God has drawn their illusions from various older “faith” sources such as Babylonian, Assyrian lore and others as well as from Hebrew.  As a consequence, the major denominations of Christianity actually believe in the literal reality of—or at least a philosophical existence of—a “fallen angel” who is referred to as the Devil and/or Satan.  The principal features on the subject of demons are presented in the early book of the New Testament—Matthew, Mark, and Luke—which then get reworked in the Acts of the Apostles.  The epistles attributed to Paul labor to declare that it is only through Christ that mankind will attain victory over principalities and material powers.  Alas, those of other faiths are doomed forever.

The New Testament proves to be no better at enlightening seekers on how infinite creative power generates energy manifestations through a process of polar activity.  Instead, the superstition that light (good) and dark (evil) are engaged in battle is played upon in Acts of the Apostles 19:15-17 and is also implied in Corinthians 11:23 and 12:9.  Both of these books are also attributed to the self-proclaimed apostle Paul who alleges that the forces of darkness knew that Paul was God’s servant and attacked him.  How, exactly, he was attacked is vague.  In the timeframe of these New Testament writings (Acts c. 84-90 CE, and 1 Corinthians c.94-100 CE), the attempt to draw converts to the new faith was shifting from promotional focus on hoped for Jewish converts to concentration on the broader mass of lesser educated people that were being incorporated into the Roman Empire. 

Demonology interweaves throughout holy word from Genesis to Revelation, with “saints” such as John referring to Satan as “…the father of lies (John 8:44).  It is in the New Testament book of Revelations, however, where Satan and his demons really rip up the scenery before meeting their just deserts.  Up to this point the Bible paints numerous references to spiritual warfare that is being waged, but the details of those ceaseless battles are scarcer than hen’s teeth.  The general sidestepping, as in Revelations 12:7-9, tells only that Michael and his angels fought against Satan and his angels.  It is oddly similar in tone to that in Daniel 10:10-13.

The contention that angels and demons are engaged in an ongoing battle pretty much punctures the theological assertion that the Creator is omniscient (all-knowing), or that his manner of creating is through peace and love was foolproof.  No power could wage a continuous “war” upon an omniscient Source-power.

For thinking persons, not believing in priest fabricated stories of a petulant, pouty, and prejudiced God does not mean that recognition of a creative Source-power is denied.  Neither is that skepticism a sign that a rationalizing mind is under the influence of some “Devil.”

Making Holy Myths

Posted in Atheist, belief, Bible, Christianity, culture, faith, humanity, life, prehistory, random, religion, thoughts with tags , , , , , on March 16, 2010 by chouck017894

Of all the creation myths of ancient peoples, the opening chapter of the book of Genesis stands in a class by itself.  Unlike all cultures Before our Common Era the priests of Yahweh in Jerusalem were busily indulging themselves in setting up the premise of divine discrimination.  The Creator they presented in Genesis, who walked in his garden and talked to himself, is thus depicted as either not omniscient (all-knowing) or as a heartless schemer.  For example, where is the wisdom of placing two tempting trees as the focal point of the garden and then forbidding two uncomprehending creatures the freedom to eat of them?  It is weak story plotting.  But it didn’t much matter, for the underlying purpose was to channel the Hebrew  people away from belief in numerous gods and goddesses to slowly, and with some difficulty, indoctrinate them with the premise of one being that created limited identities without the necessity of energy intercourse.

In this prehistory period the civilizations such as Sumer, Babylon, Egypt, Assyria, Greece, etc., recognized and respected the interactions of incalculable universal energies, and it was these unseen interrelated and interacting primal creative forces that the ancient cultures personified as a pantisocracy of “gods.”  The energies that interact throughout nature and the observable universe do often appear to be in opposition, hence the “gods” were often depicted in Pagan cultures as in competition or in a state of lust.  There was never any doubt among those Pagan cultures, however, that such creative energies originated out of a singular cause.

What the Yahweh priests contrived was the claim that the indifferent source-power of Creation had singled out one group of people (them, of course) as the sole recipients of his blessings.  To accomplish this pretext of divine discrimination the wily priest-editors referred to the same  primal and diverse energies responsible for all manifested life as their historical ancestors and dubbed those primal creative energies as Israelites.  The “gods” that were recognized by the surrounding cultures and which symbolized the same diverse creative energies were then purposely ridiculed as too lacking to have been chosen by the source power which the author-priests referred to as Yahweh.  But this counter assault on Pagan wisdom necessitated finding a means to explain the diverse energy-attributes that were presented and personified with the Pagan gods.

The priest-editors of reworked Hebrew myths certainly knew what the Pagan gods symbolized: they knew that there are energy interactions all through the universe that, although unseen for the most part, do have an effect on life forces.  The way out for demoting the Pagan gods was simply to give those forces a different designation, so the diverse forces were reassigned by the priests of Yahweh from acknowledgment as Pagan “gods” to Yahweh’s servants which were hailed as “angels.”  For all extent and purpose, the attributes and special duties of the Pagan gods were simply transferred to a regiment of “angels.”  The angels, of course, were envisioned as acting under the direction of an amoral source-power personified as Yahweh-God.  We must note that amoral does not mean immoral: it means that any judgmental inclination or personality features are not present. 

The Demotion of Eve.      In the earliest part of Genesis the character of Eve is referred to as “Mother of all living” (Genesis 3:20), which suggests the rank of a near-sacred being.  This title that Adam allegedly bestowed upon Eve, “Mother of all living,” is identical to what the Sumerians had bestowed upon the love goddess Aruru, for she was regarded in their culture as the creatrix of life.  Eve’s implied eminence in Genesis, even after making a fruit-picking mistake, reflects the Pagan understanding that creation of all life can take place only through a process of polar energy interaction.  This is why various neighboring cultures that the Yahweh priests so envied, such as Sumerian, Phoenician, Hittie, Ugaritic, etc., gave homage to goddesses as being equal in divine power with the gods.  But Eve, according to the Yahweh priests, was demoted and declared to have been designed by Yahweh-Jehovah simply to serve as Adam’s helpmeet.  This was the deliberate capsizing of Pagan understanding, and it had no parallel in any other early Mediterranean or Middle Eastern myths.  The advantage of this slight-of-hand was that it placed man (especially the political minded priests) in the authoritative position.  Unfortunately, by demoting the feminine polar aspect necessary for life production, the Genesis myth of Creation insanely rejects the fundamental polar energy principle necessary for Creation.  And western religious understanding of the basic principle of creation and the fruition (evolution) of life manifestation has been plagued with controversy and  misunderstanding ever since.

A Gaggle of Angels

Posted in Atheist, Bible, Christianity, culture, life, random, religion with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 6, 2009 by chouck017894

The first mention of an angel in biblical myths is in Genesis 16:7 where Abram’s concubine, Hagar, pregnant with Abram’s “seed,” has fled into “the wilderness” to escape Sarai’s jealous wrath.  “And an angel of Yahweh found her (Hagar) at the water well (or “fountain of waters”) in the wilderness…” verse 7 tells us.  It should be noted that at this point of the myth neither Abram nor Sarai have yet had the letter H added to their names.  (The significance of adding the letter H and the hidden meaning of “wilderness” and “water well” are revealed in The Celestial Scriptures.)

This introduction to “angels” into the story also carries with it a glut of subtle clues that only the  in-crowd of priestly reciters were privy to, for they used a sacred language style to disguise “holy” meanings to themselves and away from the uneducated masses.  As a result the writing gets a little confusing at times.  For example, as the “angel” speaks to Hagar, that which is being spoken shifts from a kind of third-person messenge-service pronouncement to words being spoken by God himself.  It should be noted that in the earliest presentations of “angels,” this was an intentionally indistinct method of storytelling by overlapping the deity with the lesser “angel” image to convey the illusion that “angels” were simply an expression of God’s presense.

Belief in multiple gods, as recognized in Pagan cultures, was regarded by the Judaic authors to be irreligious, but their various “angels,” entrusted with essentially the same attributes and responsibilities, was held to be a  different story.

Later in Genesis, two angels are portrayed as arriving at the door of Abraham’s nephew Lot, who lived in Sodom.  Oddly, Lot addressed the pair as “My Lord” (Genesis 19:18).  The message given by the pair was apparently presented as something like a singing telegram: “Flee there quickly (to the near-by city of Zoar) because I cannot do a thing until you get there.”  Lot protests that Zoar “…is a little city” and that “it is near.”  (Why the word is was stressed is explained in The Celestial Scriptures.)

As noted in Time Frames and Taboo Data, the archangel lineup from Judaic lore cagily personified our solar system’s planets.  Thus the archangel Michael personifies the Sun; Gabriel, the Moon; Raphael, the planet Mercury; Samael, the planet Mars; Sadkiel, the planet Jupiter; and  Cassiel, the planet Saturn.  The archangel Arnad was the last to be enlisted into the ranks of archangels and represented the young planet Venus.  A Talmudic passage freely acknowledges that the names of the angels, the names of the months, and even the letters of the alphabet were brought  from the exile in Babylon.

Christians got the holy lowdown on angels when the Council of  Bishops was assembled by Pope Liberius in 364 to determine what would and would not be considered canon.  Strictly regulated were rituals, precedents, heresy, baptism, fasts, angel worship, etc.  There was agreement that  referring to angels by name was forbidden. 

The Jewish recognition of angels that had been carried over into Christian myth became a near obsession during the Dark Ages.  By 787  the Second Council of Nicaea determined that angels might receive reverential obeisance, but were not to receive divine worship.  It was also determined after much haggling that nine orders of angels existed wherein archangels made up the eighth level—or next highest in management duties. 

Of course angels became a prominent feature in Muslim lore also for, as noted earlier, it was the angel from Jewish myth that comes to Abram’s concubine Hagar.  “And an angel of Yahweh found her (Hagar) at the water well in the wilderness” (Genesis 16:7) and told her that God  would “greatly muliply thy seed” and the son that she would bear was to be named Ishmael.  The Mohammedans therefore look upon Hagar as Abram’s true wife and upon Ishmael as the favorite son.  Thus the genealogical traditions of Hebrews and Arabs were made to unite and provided the foundation for the establishment of Islam.  And by borrowing from Judaic/Christian fabrication of angels, it was easy to accept that when Mohammed went into battle at Badr and Mecca he had allegedly been assisted by 1000 to 3000 angels.